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Showing posts from April, 2019

Halfway To Halloween

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The taxes are done, Midsummer Scream will soon be upon us, and two more months before Halloween starts showing up in retail stores. Happy Halfway to Halloween!

My Favorite Horror Films of the Last 10 Years

A recent tweet sent out by Travis Stevens , Founder and CEO of Snowfort Pictures who specializes in genre films including The Endless, XX, We Are Still Here, Cheap Thrills , and Starry Eyes asked followers to list their top 5 films made in the last 10 years. It was a challenge to encapsulate the last 10 years of horror brilliance into only 5 films, so I thought I would share my whole list here (subject to change as I'm reminded of glaring omissions). I interpreted this as release dates between 2009–2018. Some films are made and shelved or not distributed until a year or two later so I don't rely solely on IMDB dates. Also my guiding philosophy is as follows: movies I'd want to see again, own, have significant artistic merit or cultural impact, and lasting power – and not necessarily the best reviewed movies. Here we go. 🔥 Hereditary 🐐 The Witch 🎩 The Babadook 🎃 Trick 'r Treat 💎 mother! This was excruciatingly difficult. My initial list had 30+ fi

The Curse of La Llorona Sidelines Folklore & Mexicans

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The Curse of La Llorona takes cherished Mexican folklore and disappointingly centers it around a distressed white woman. This is an atmospheric, often creepy, and well-produced film, but its lethargic pace, awful script, and aimless direction often leaves both the audience and even the characters saying, “Now what?” It builds a good amount suspense but then delivers only jump scares and cracked mirrors. For such a frightening figure, this movie is lacking some serious cohones. The script only passingly mentions the back story of La Llorona and never really attempts any meaningful connection to the culture or the time period. Why exactly is La Llorona in Los Angeles? Seems a wee bit off from Mexico, so I'm guessing she's vacationing? One wonders why this movie could not be set in Mexico, and maybe left as a period piece. The answer is simple: this movie is made for mainstream American audiences who will not tolerate subtitles, full Mexican casts, and intended to capitalize

The Art of Picking Horror Movies & Avoiding Spoilers

I did it! I managed to not have Us or Pet Semetary spoiled for me in any way. I made a decision several years ago to completely give up trailers, reviews, and social media ahead of a film's release. But how do I figure out which movies to watch and which ones to avoid? Here’s my plan: 1. Watch Trailers the Right Way Avoiding trailers is both obvious and impossible to do. They are an undeniable elixir. Marketers don’t care what is spoiled in hopes of hooking mainstream audiences who need to see an entire movie in 2 minutes before they plunk down $14 to sit through 2 hours. All the money shots (jump scares, effects, and big reveals) are featured. I'll watch teaser trailers that are usually compiled from early shots before major effects are completed. You can typically also watch the first 30-45 seconds of the very first trailer (there's usually 2-3 trailers of increasing spoilage) to get a taste without major reveals. Avoid all TV trailers. They are condensed and co

Quick Takes: The Wind, Border, Searching, Now Apocalypse

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The Wind offers stunning vistas, a chilling soundtrack & harrowing lead performance. As a frontier-period set indie, it's ambitious in scope, unsettling, and the disjointed story creates disorienting dread. An enigmatic finale undercuts the emotional punch almost to ruin.   Border glumly grapples with issues of beauty, identity, compliance, stranger danger & family secrets. The cast is stellar & a mid-point pivot steeped in folklore loses its grip, growing more hypnotic, bizarre & dangerously unpredictable, choking your heart & throat.   Searching while rooted in a gimmick ends up being deeply absorbing & relentless due completely to John Cho's frenetic energy & commitment. It's impossible to tear your eyes away from the screens as he hunts for his missing daughter with a Machiavellian, emotional finale.   Now Apocalypse is an angsty 20something L.A. trip full of sex positivity, inclusion, & a plot unmoored